ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

ART 3 PROGRAM SERIES ARTIST TALK

Raul Zamudio in conversation with Alexis de Chaunac, Saturday September 26, 6 - 7 PM

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

ART 3 PROGRAM SERIES ARTIST TALK

Raul Zamudio in conversation with Alexis de Chaunac, Saturday September 26, 6 - 7 PM

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

Mictlantecuhtli (Deity of Death) (Anthropology)

2015

Oil stick and acrylic on paper

25 x 19 in. (63.5 x 48.26 cm)

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

Divinity of the Underworld (Anthropology)

2015

Oil stick and acrylic on paper

43.5 x 29.5 in. (110.49 x 74.93 cm)

Divinity of the Underworld (Anthropology)

2015

 

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper 

25.5 x 260.5 inches (64.8 x 661.7 cm)

from left to right: Bartolomeo (Bartholomew); Giacomo Minore (James the Lesser); Andrea (Andrew)

 

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper 

25.5 x 260.5 inches (64.8 x 661.7 cm)

from left to right: Giuda (Judas Iscariot) ; Simon Pietro (Simon Peter); Giovanni (John) 

 

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper 

25.5 x 260.5 inches (64.8 x 661.7 cm)

Center Figure: Gesu Cristo (Jesus Christ) 

 

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper 

25.5 x 260.5 inches (64.8 x 661.7 cm)

from left to right: Tommaso (Thomas); Giacomo Maggiore (James the Greater) ; Filippo (Philip)

 

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropology, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Polyptych – The Last Supper (2015)

13 oil stick works on paper 

25.5 x 260.5 inches (64.8 x 661.7 cm)

from left to right: Matteo (Matthew); Giuda Taddeo (Judas Thaddaeus); Simon Zelota (Simon the Zealot) 

 

Polyptych -The Last Supper, de Chaunac’s reworking of the centuries-old Christian iconography, realizes something utterly contemporary that shades into the sacral. Portraying faces of the naturally mummified bodies of people who died in a cholera outbreak in 1833 in Guanajuato, Mexico, today known as The Mummies of Guanajuato, the artist refers to the form of a polyptych (a work of art composed of several connected painted or carved panels, often hinged for folding, with one “central” panel most commonly created to be altar pieces in churches and cathedrals in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance).  

 

The Mummies of Guanajuato were exhumed between 1865 and 1958 and show bodies that were preserved in very good condition due to the minerals in the soil in which they were laid. Many of them were entombed immediately after their death to control the spread of the epidemic and in some cases, the dying were buried alive by accident. As a result, we observe a diversity of ways of “being” at the threshold of death where each final expression is frozen forever. El Museo de las Momias in Guanajuato now exhibits the mummies and they are considered an important part of Mexican popular culture, echoing the celebratory Day of the Dead.  

 

In his black-and-white polyptych composed of 13 works, the artist makes a strong reference to Christ and the 12 Apostles.  The only presence of color is the heart of Jesus that radiates with a deep red from the Christ portrait, which is at the center of the work. Polyptych -The Last Supper reveals the last breath on each face, fixed in their final expression as the dying person nears oblivion.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

Embryonic Development (Keimesentwicklung) 

2015

44h x 32.5w in  (111.76h x 82.55w cm)

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

objects:  Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg; a wooden hand, the cover of the 1911 edition of Le Traite d'Anatomie Humaine by Charpy & Poirier

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine 

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine (page 1 of 4)

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine (page 2 of 4)

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine (page 3 of 4)

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine (page 4 of 4)

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger worksEmbryonic Development, Traité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic), Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panel, Traité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panel, Chirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A Dance with Life and Death

September 16 – October 25, 2015

 

The exhibition is comprised of three bodies of work: Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, Anthropologie, Polyptych -The Last Supper

 

 

Traité d’Anatomie Humaine

50 watercolors drawn on original book pages from the 1911 edition of Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine published by P. Poirirer and A. Charpy, Paris, France. The first edition of Le Traite d’Anatomie Humaine dates from 1899.

6 larger works:  Embryonic DevelopmentTraité d'Anatomie Humaine (Arabic)Embryological Study of the Fetus in Arabic wooden panelTraité d'Anatomie Humaine on wooden panelChirurgie and Embryological Study of the Fetus on Ostrich Egg.

 

Le Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, is one of the very first medical studies that explores the origins of embryology by following the development process of the fetus from cell to embryo. Anatomist, A.Charpy wrote the Traité after studying half-dead fresh cadaver specimens. He confirmed anatomic variations, mainly according to age and sex, and described the detailed mechanisms of aging. His text is complemented by high quality anatomical drawings which were the starting points for De Chaunac renderings of each of his face portraits in the series. Working directly on the century-old book was an opportunity for De Chaunac to renew his interest with the origins of 20th century modern medicine, which produced new anatomic concepts that are still applied today in facial rejuvenating procedures and facelifts. Through the Traité d’Anatomie Humaine, De Chaunac tried to dissect the human face in all its variations and hues and come up with a theory of human physiology. In this body of work, the artist addresses the origins of life and the realization of our own finality.

ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC

A DANCE WITH LIFE & DEATH

September 16 – October 25, 2015

Press

WHITEWALL ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC: A DANCE WITH LIFE AND DEATH by Katy Donoghue, October 19, 2015
WHITEHOT MAGAZINE, A Dance with Life & Death: ART 3 Interview by Jeffrey Grunthaner, October 2015
NY1 Noticias La búsqueda trascendendental del pintor Alexis de Chaunac
BUSHWHICK DAILY What Bushwick Art to see This Week-end
ARTSY Editorial | How Trilingual Painter Alexis de Chaunac Wrestles with His Multiple Histories by Molly Osberg
NY ART BEAT, Alexis de Chaunac "A Dance with Life & Death"
CULTURAL SERVICES OF THE FRENCH EMBASSY, ALEXIS DE CHAUNAC FIRST SOLO SHOW, September 16 - October 25, 2015
EYES IN Magazine, Dance With Life & Death at Hypnotic NYC Exhibition, Alexis de Chaunac's Breathtaking Exhibition Explores Life & Death
TRAITE D'ANATOMIE HUMAINE by A. Charpy and P. Poirier (Alexis de Chaunac, A Dance with Life & Death)